Partnerships

Concrete Log Homes Provide an Alternative for Home Builders in Fire Threatened Western U.S.

 Republishing an article first published by Energy Shift in our January 2008 newsletter. Seems more appropriate than ever…

Witnessing the heartbreak and destruction of wildfires in the western United States brings many thoughts to mind… why did they build homes in some of these locations; is climate change going to make this more and more common; did our Forest Service policies create conditions that actually increase the likelihood of fires burning out of control? Whatever the answers are to these and other tough questions, people are going to continue to build homes in remote locations surrounded by forest.

A new approach to building one’s dream home, or other structures such as mountain lodges; cultural centers, etc. may provide a win-win alternative to traditional methods. Cultured Logs, made of concrete, provide significant benefits and eliminate many of the risks associated with log structures. At the same time, energy savings are substantial, as are cost savings, upkeep, and the concrete used provides a productive end use for fly ash—a waste material.

Advantages and Benefits of Cultured Logs:

? Exact Look and Feel of Wood Logs
? Fire Resistant
? Maintenance Free
       – No Preserving,
       – No Re-Staining or Re-Sealing Required
? Mold Free
? No Decay
? Insect Free
? Environmentally Friendly
       – Energy Efficient, concrete retains internal temperature
               more efficiently than wood
       – No Harvesting of Trees

? Insulated Cultured Logs Result in Lower Heating and
       Cooling Costs (30-40% lower than a wood log home)
? Lower Homeowners’ Insurance Premiums
? Competitively Priced with Wood Logs
? Structural Performance
       – No Shifting, Twisting, Settling or Shrinking
       – Superior Performance in Earthquakes and
               Hurricanes.

Go to concetelogs.com to see close up views of the “logs”

One Response to Concrete Log Homes Provide an Alternative for Home Builders in Fire Threatened Western U.S.